[Image: A Black woman holding a pink sign that says, “Sleeping on the streets or walking down the aisle? It’s time to start prioritizing LGBT youth.”]
I saw this floating around facebook today. Credit where credit is due.

[Image: A Black woman holding a pink sign that says, “Sleeping on the streets or walking down the aisle? It’s time to start prioritizing LGBT youth.”]

I saw this floating around facebook today. Credit where credit is due.

[Image: photo of “family” car stickers portraying a nuclear family of one mom and one dad]

So I found this while shopping for stuff for my new apt. The fact that a nuclear family is portrayed is fine, but I’m taking issue with the fact that THE nuclear family was the only option available to consumers.

[Image: photo of “family” car stickers portraying a nuclear family of one mom and one dad]

So I found this while shopping for stuff for my new apt. The fact that a nuclear family is portrayed is fine, but I’m taking issue with the fact that THE nuclear family was the only option available to consumers.

Stonewall was a Wedding?

Are we done yet? Do we have to endure another full day of self-congratulation at Obama’s personal endorsement of same-sex marriage? His announcement was heralded with as much praise as last summer’s legalization of gay marriage in New York. And that was, you know, actual legislation.

This is hardly surprising given the fact that marriage equality is designed to distract liberal consciences and give Democrats political cover to gut social services. While the passage of gay marriage enjoyed the support of prominent campaign donors, it was directly preceded by cuts to homeless shelters for queer youth. It’s a campaign season bait-and-switch — winning votes without making real concessions.

Case in point: Bloomberg commended Obama for joining a legacy of “courageous stands that so many Americans have taken over the years on behalf of equal rights for gay and lesbian Americans, stretching back to the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village.” This days after slashing youth homeless shelter funding by $7 million, in a city where40% of homeless youth are LGBT.

Looked at from this vantage point, the chief beneficiaries of gay marriage will be Crate & Barrel, not the queer folks with the most desperate needs. There is an obvious disconnect between the desires of politically connected, wealthy gay people and the needs of queer youth, and yet the major gay rights organizations have all rallied around gay marriage as if it will solve the problems of gay people everywhere, regardless of race or class.

Gay marriage proponents feed us two flavors of justification for their crusade. For the romantics they supply fantasy — the notion that legal inclusion brings social justice; for the cynics, they tout the thousand individual rights that a marriage certificate bestows.

These arguments should raise serious red flags for the Jacobin rank-and-file, and indeed, neither holds water. You’d think in the “age of the 99%,” we teeming masses would be able to see that what’s good for the few isn’t good for us all. It’s true that marriage comes with material advantages — healthcare, citizenship, and inheritance chief among them — but therein also lies the problem. Marriage consolidates privilege by creating a legal basis for denying access to those thousand rights; it literally sanctions discrimination. Instead of bestowing rights based on relationship status, the state should guarantee those rights for all people. Instead we attach basic rights to an institution with a 50% failure rate.

The obsession with marriage also sanitizes the history of queer struggle. Stonewall was not a wedding, it was a riot, led by the very queers who are now erased from the public image of gay equality. Drag queens, trans people of color, young queers, and butch dykes fought systematic violence and in Sarah Schulman’s words, “[…] arose to change society, to expand rigid gender roles, to break down confining social mores of privatized families and to defy the consumerism that accompanies monogamy and nuclear family lifestyle in the United States.” That transformative vision has been sidelined by the marriage crowd, who are content to bestow rights only on the deserving few. Are there really members of our society undeserving of health care?

Only the most privileged among us could possibly see the fight for the right to party as a movement for social justice. Proponents tout the implications for healthcare and immigration status while members of our queer and trans communities are denied basic treatment in prison, while they are harassed and ejected by ICE. Loving couples making a public commitment to one another is a beautiful thing, but it is erroneously touted by gay rights groups as the single most pressing justice issue facing queer people. Issues of access to healthcare, education, and housing go unmentioned.

Look no further than Argentina for real leadership in queer politics. While we were busy patting ourselves on the back, the Argentine legislature passed the Gender Identity Law, arguably the most gender-affirming bill in any country, to date. Argentineans can now change their legal genders without having to demonstrate any medical treatment, and the public and private healthcare systems in the country are banned from charging extra for gender-related therapies or procedures. These changes may not have the comforting ring of wedding bells, but they address administrative inequalities that present huge obstacles to trans people in accessing basic services. And it teaches us that by building power for vulnerable communities, legislative reform can be an important part of movements for social justice.

BREAKING: Obama Embraces Marriage Equality
President Obama has come out in support of marriage equality for gay and lesbian people in an interview with ABC News’ Robin Roberts this afternoon:

OBAMA: I have to tell you that over the course of several years as I have talked to friends and family and neighbors when I think about members of my own staff who are in incredibly committed monogamous relationships, same-sex relationships, who are raising kids together, when I think about those soldiers or airmen or marines or sailors who are out there fighting on my behalf and yet feel constrained, even now that Don’t Ask Don’t Tell is gone, because they are not able to commit themselves in a marriage, at a certain point I’ve just concluded that for me personally it is important for me to go ahead and affirm that I think same sex couples should be able to get married.

His endorsement comes less than a week after Vice President Joe Biden embraced the issue during an appearance on Meet The Press and a day after North Carolina banned marriage equality and civil unions in its state constitution.
The president last made news on the freedom to marry 560 days ago, when he told progressive journalists at the White House that he is evolving towards greater acceptance.
Obama’s remarks today bring him full circle to his position in 1996, when he was running for the Illinois state Senate. In response to a questionnaire from Chicago’s Outlines gay newspaper, he proclaimed, “I favor legalizing same-sex marriages, and would fight efforts to prohibit such marriages.”
Source.

BREAKING: Obama Embraces Marriage Equality

President Obama has come out in support of marriage equality for gay and lesbian people in an interview with ABC News’ Robin Roberts this afternoon:

OBAMA: I have to tell you that over the course of several years as I have talked to friends and family and neighbors when I think about members of my own staff who are in incredibly committed monogamous relationships, same-sex relationships, who are raising kids together, when I think about those soldiers or airmen or marines or sailors who are out there fighting on my behalf and yet feel constrained, even now that Don’t Ask Don’t Tell is gone, because they are not able to commit themselves in a marriage, at a certain point I’ve just concluded that for me personally it is important for me to go ahead and affirm that I think same sex couples should be able to get married.

His endorsement comes less than a week after Vice President Joe Biden embraced the issue during an appearance on Meet The Press and a day after North Carolina banned marriage equality and civil unions in its state constitution.

The president last made news on the freedom to marry 560 days ago, when he told progressive journalists at the White House that he is evolving towards greater acceptance.

Obama’s remarks today bring him full circle to his position in 1996, when he was running for the Illinois state Senate. In response to a questionnaire from Chicago’s Outlines gay newspaper, he proclaimed, “I favor legalizing same-sex marriages, and would fight efforts to prohibit such marriages.”

Source.

[Image: A photo of the Tyler Haynes Common’s Pier at the University of Richmond. Taken from the second floor, looking down. In the middle of the photo is a rafter with a rainbow flag hanging vertically on the left side and a black flag with a pink triangle also hanging vertically on the right.]
Every April, the University of Richmond’s queer activist group, the Student Alliance for Sexual Diversity (SASD) co-opts the month of April to celebrate LGBTQ Pride month. This year, we got permission from the University to hang a rainbow and pink triangle flag in the student commons in celebration.

[Image: A photo of the Tyler Haynes Common’s Pier at the University of Richmond. Taken from the second floor, looking down. In the middle of the photo is a rafter with a rainbow flag hanging vertically on the left side and a black flag with a pink triangle also hanging vertically on the right.]

Every April, the University of Richmond’s queer activist group, the Student Alliance for Sexual Diversity (SASD) co-opts the month of April to celebrate LGBTQ Pride month. This year, we got permission from the University to hang a rainbow and pink triangle flag in the student commons in celebration.

a friend of mine just shared this on facebook, so i thought i’d share it with you. super cute.

"You can argue that it’s a different world now than the one when Matthew Shepard was killed, but there is a subtle difference between tolerance and acceptance. It’s the distance between moving into the cul-de-sac and having your next-door neighbor trust you to keep an eye on her preschool daughter for a few minutes while she runs out to the post office. It’s the chasm between being invited to a colleague’s wedding with your same-sex partner and being able to slow-dance without the other guests whispering."
Jodi Picoult, Sing You Home

friend…. no. the struggle of gender and sexual minority (GSM) americans is in NO way similar to the struggle of african americans in this country. gsm individuals were not
1. taken by force from their homeland
2. brutally enslaved for centuries
3. systematically lynched
4. subject to systematic, government sponsored segregatation
5. subject to contemporary, systematic racism
for more on this subject please read a reblogged post regarding the appropriation of the civil rights movement and the struggle of black people to the women’s rights movement. or if you have any questions on this, feel free to inbox me.

friend…. no. the struggle of gender and sexual minority (GSM) americans is in NO way similar to the struggle of african americans in this country. gsm individuals were not

1. taken by force from their homeland

2. brutally enslaved for centuries

3. systematically lynched

4. subject to systematic, government sponsored segregatation

5. subject to contemporary, systematic racism

for more on this subject please read a reblogged post regarding the appropriation of the civil rights movement and the struggle of black people to the women’s rights movement. or if you have any questions on this, feel free to inbox me.

GPOY

GPOY